Last edited by Nirg
Thursday, May 14, 2020 | History

6 edition of Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland found in the catalog.

Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland

James Vi"s Demonology and the North Berwick Witches (Exeter Studies in History)

  • 295 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by University of Exeter Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • British & Irish history: c 1500 to c 1700,
  • Satanism & demonology,
  • Witchcraft,
  • New Age,
  • History,
  • Body, Mind & Spirit,
  • New Age / Body, Mind & Spirit,
  • Witchcraft & Wicca,
  • Scotland,
  • Magick Studies,
  • Modern - General,
  • 16th century

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsLawrence Normand (Editor), Gareth Roberts (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages448
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8304687M
    ISBN 100859896803
    ISBN 109780859896801

      Buy Witchcraft In Early Modern Scotland: James VI's Demonology and the North Berwick Witches (Exeter Studies in History) by Lawrence Normand|Gareth Roberts (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low 5/5(6). Brian P. Levack, editor Brian P. Levack is the John E. Green Regents Professor in History at the University of Texas at Austin. He has published widely on English and Scottish legal history and the history of witchcraft prosecutions. His publications on witchcraft include The Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe (3rd edn, ) and Witch-Hunting in Scotland: Law, Politics and .

      Although magic and witchcraft had existed since antiquity, early modern Europe underwent a growth in anxiety about witches and their practices that led to a period of heightened witch hunting. Social and economic problems, changes to the legal system, and religious upheaval all served as necessary preconditions for the age of witch-hunts. Witchcraft, Gender and Society in Early Modern Germany Book Description: Using the example of Eichstätt, this book challenges current witchcraft historiography by arguing that the gender of the witch-suspect was a product of the interrogation process and that the stable communities affected by persecution did not collude in its escalation.

    This book is a collection of essays on Scottish witchcraft. Unlike most such works, it concentrates on witchcraft beliefs rather than witch-hunting. It ranges widely across areas of popular belief, culture, and ritual practice, as well as dealing with intellectual life and incorporating regional and comparative elements.   A podcast on the witch hunt in the lateth century in Scotland Music: Music from Brooklyn, the original motion picture sound track, by Michael Brook References: Jonathan Barry, Marianne Hester.


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Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland Download PDF EPUB FB2

“Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland will be immensely useful for scholars of witchcraft, demonology, early modern women, as well as those who study Scottish political, religious, legal, and social history.

The contextual information in Part One is clearly presented and accessible for scholars with only a cursory knowledge of early modern Scotland; and detailed annotations of Cited by: 9. This is a book which will be welcomed, and much used, by the specialist in witchcraft history, which will also be invaluable to teachers and students both of early modern witchcraft and of early modern Scottish history more generally, and which will also be read with profit by those with a more general interest in such matters.

Archives A. Although the Inquisition began in the late Medieval Period, it was during the Early Modern period that the witch hunt in Europe began in earnest, beginning with the early witch trails in the 15th Century. In England, for example, the first Act of Parliament directed specifically against witchcraft was the act “De hæretico comburendo”, passed at the instigation of Archbishop Thomas.

Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland: James VI’s Demonology and the North Berwick Witches By (author) Lawrence Normand; By (author) Gareth Roberts. and the history of witchcraft prosecutions in Scotland before The book also brings to bear on this material current scholarship on the history of European witchcraft.

Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland Book Description: This volume provides a valuable introduction to the key concepts of witchcraft and demonology through a detailed study of one of the best known and most notorious episodes of Scottish history, the North Berwick witch hunt, in which King James was involved as alleged victim, interrogator.

Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. This volume provides a valuable introduction to the ke /5(11). Buy Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland: James' VI's Demonology and the North Berwick Witches by Lawrence Normand|Gareth Roberts (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.5/5(6). Witchcraft and belief in Early Modern Scotland (Palgrave Historical Studies in Witchcraft and Magic) [Goodare, J., Martin, L., Miller, J.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Witchcraft and belief in Early Modern Scotland (Palgrave Historical Studies in 5/5(1).

Julian Goodare is a Reader in History at the University of Edinburgh. He is the author of State and Society in Early Modern Scotland () and The Government of Scotland, - ().

His edited books include The Reign of James VI () (co-edited with Michael Lynch) and Sixteenth-Century Scotland: Essays in Honour of Michael Lynch () /5(11). This book provides an introduction to the key concepts of witchcraft and demonology through a detailed study of one of the best-known and most notorious episodes of Scottish history — the North Berwick witch hunt — in which King James was involved as alleged victim, interrogator, judge, and demonologist.

It provides hitherto unpublished and inaccessible material from the Author: Lawrence Normand. Get this from a library. Witchcraft and belief in early modern Scotland. [Julian Goodare; Lauren Martin; Joyce Miller;] -- "Witchcraft has almost always had an important place in people's belief systems, helping them to organise and understand their ideas about community and neighbourliness, good and evil, harm and.

The book also brings to bear on this material current scholarship on the history of European witchcraft. Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland James. The pages of a year-old book used to record the names of those accused of witchcraft in Scotland are published online.

This volume provides a valuable introduction to the key concepts of witchcraft and demonology through a detailed study of one of the best known and most notorious episodes of Scottish history, the North Berwick witch hunt, in which King James was involved as alleged victim, interrogator, judge and demonologist.

It provides hitherto unpublished and inaccessible material from the. 'This is an excellent collection of academic essays on various aspects of early modern Scottish witchcraft Highly recommended as a serious research book for anyone who is interested in historical witch beliefs and practices in Scotland.' - The Cauldron.

Shortlisted for the Katharine Briggs Folklore Award. This pioneering collection concentrates on witchcraft beliefs rather than witch-hunting. It ranges widely across areas of popular belief, culture and ritual practice, as well as dealing with intellectual life and incorporating regional and comparative elements.

A collection of essays on Scottish witchcraft and witch-hunting, which covers the whole period of the Scottish witch-hunt, from the mid-sixteenth century to the early eighteenth.

Includes studies of particular witchcraft panics such as a reassessment of the role of King James VI. Covers a wide range of topics concerned with Scottish witch-hunting and places it in the context of other.

Historians have named the era in Europe that lasted from about to the age of the “Witch Hunts.” During this period approximatelypeople went on trial for the crime of witchcraft with around half of them found guilty and executed.

The population of early modern Scotland was more evenly distributed than it is today, so the preponderance of witches in Scotland's central belt is really striking. The top county for witch-hunting was Haddingtonshire (East Lothian). When were the prosecutions. The Witchcraft Act was in force between and Get this from a library.

Witchcraft in early modern Scotland: James VI's Demonology and the North Berwick witches. [Lawrence Normand; Gareth Roberts;] -- From toScotland saw its first major witch-hunt.

This book examines the political, demonological and cultural forces which shaped the North Berwick witchcraft case, and provides edited. Witches in early modern Scotland. Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have identified over 3, cases of witchcraft accusation in early modern Scotland between andits peak between and when there were five large-scale witch hunts.Men – as accused witches, witch-hunters, werewolves and the demonically possessed – are the focus of analysis in this collection of essays by leading scholars of early modern European witchcraft.

The gendering of witch persecution and witchcraft belief is explored through original case-studies from England, Scotland, Italy, Germany and France. From the midth to the early 18th century, close to 4, people in Scotland—overwhelmingly women—were tried for witchcraft. Up to two thirds of this number may have been executed.